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Thread: Number of living Negro Leaguers ?

  1. #1

    Number of living Negro Leaguers ?

    Does anyone know how many Negro League players that are still alive ?

  2. #2
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    Millito

    Fan :
    I really don't know , but here in Puerto Rico , Millito Navarro is about to turn 104 years young , and still going strong . He is the eldest living negro leaguer ( i think ) .
    caribeņo

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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by caribeņo View Post
    Fan :
    I really don't know , but here in Puerto Rico , Millito Navarro is about to turn 104 years young , and still going strong . He is the eldest living negro leaguer ( i think ) .
    caribeņo
    According to Wikipedia, Navarro is still around and he is still the oldest living Negro Leagues player and oldest living professional baseball player.

  5. #5
    HOFers Monte Irvin (who is in based on his NL play, while the others in this list were there as stops along the way), Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, and Ernie Banks that I know of off hand.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by History Of Baseball Fan View Post
    Does anyone know how many Negro League players that are still alive ?
    That's got to be difficult to determine. There is a Negro Leagues Association that does a lot of research, has photo archives, and answers a lot of questions about it's history. You could do a standard Google Search to come up with that organization's exact name.
    Another thing is do you want to determine a cutoff point? I'd suggest 3 years. 1947, 1953 & 1960.
    1960 would give you every player who ever played in the Negro Leagues even in the late 1950's when the quality of play had to be watered down, with the better prospects signing with major league teams.
    1947 would give you every player who is still alive that was in Negro Leagues ball at the time of Jackie Robinson's integration.
    1953 Would be the last year some people consider the Negro Leagues a major league. The East-West Negro Leagues All-Star game had been held annually since about 1930 and the last one was played in August 1953. '53 was the last year there was enough interest to stage the game because talent was being siphoned away by major league teams. Whereas in 1946 and other years that immediately followed World War Two where the Negro League All-Star game would include eight to ten players on All-Star rosters who would eventually play in the major leagues, the 1953 game would produce only two future major leaguers: Ernie Banks and Francisco "Pancho" Herrera. There would be no encore for the game in 1954 as the best black players were now all signing with major league organizations and in terms of quality of play the Negro Leagues could no longer be regarded as a Major League.

  7. #7
    The Negro American League of 1950 is the last major league in Riley's Biographical Encyclopedia. The Encyclopedia tries to cover everyone in the major leagues but there are not many entries for later players.

  8. #8
    Of players that debuted in the Negro Leagues 1950 and before, the number is probably less than 50. Of those 50 that were "prominent" players in the league, it's probably around 10 or so. Off the top I would include: (East-West All-Stars) Monte Irvin, Minnie Minoso, Bill Cash, Art Pennington, Artie Wilson, Bill Greason and Willie Williams. Experienced non-all stars: Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn, Mule Miles, Joe B. Scott, Herb Simpson. After that we're looking at rookies and role players. Not to discredit anyone. They were there as professionals and are the last that have the stories to tell about the league when it was going. If you did this poll 10-15 years ago, we'd have alot more to go on. I've watched it shrink since I've been paying attention in 1994. I wish I would have gotten to more of them while they were living.
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  9. #9
    According to The Courier, the newsletter of SABR's Negro Leagues Committee there are only 240 surviving Negro Leagues players.

    I'm not sure in which issue this information appeared (the number was passed along by another SABR member). If you go to the SABR website (www.sabr.org), you can find PDFs of committee newsletters (click on "research" on the main menu and then go to the Negro Leagues page).

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by SABRSusan View Post
    According to The Courier, the newsletter of SABR's Negro Leagues Committee there are only 240 surviving Negro Leagues players.

    I'm not sure in which issue this information appeared (the number was passed along by another SABR member). If you go to the SABR website (www.sabr.org), you can find PDFs of committee newsletters (click on "research" on the main menu and then go to the Negro Leagues page).
    I thought there would be more than 240 still around. Thanks for the info !

  11. #11

    Philly Stars

    Quote Originally Posted by metrotheme View Post
    Of players that debuted in the Negro Leagues 1950 and before, the number is probably less than 50. Of those 50 that were "prominent" players in the league, it's probably around 10 or so. Off the top I would include: (East-West All-Stars) Monte Irvin, Minnie Minoso, Bill Cash, Art Pennington, Artie Wilson, Bill Greason and Willie Williams. Experienced non-all stars: Mahlon Duckett, Stanley Glenn, Mule Miles, Joe B. Scott, Herb Simpson. After that we're looking at rookies and role players. Not to discredit anyone. They were there as professionals and are the last that have the stories to tell about the league when it was going. If you did this poll 10-15 years ago, we'd have alot more to go on. I've watched it shrink since I've been paying attention in 1994. I wish I would have gotten to more of them while they were living.
    Mahlon Duckett and Stanley Glenn played for the Negro Leagues' Philadelphia Stars and the Phillies still have them back as guests or honorees for two or three events each season.

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