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Thread: instructional hitting for 8 year old

  1. #1

    instructional hitting for 8 year old

    hey everyone, im new to this website, I stumbled upon it 4 days ago and i caint stop reading threads now, "im hooked" folks here seem so knowledgable..

    i posted a thread the other day asking for advise on type of bat for my 8 year old, im beyond that now, and I would like to know peoples opinion on best method of instructional hitting for him.."If this is the wrong section to post this question please direct me to the right one"!

    I been reading post on Epstein system and the whole rotational method seems very interesting, whats the best way i can get my son introduced to this type of teachings?

    considering his age, he has received many complements from different coaches on his power, swing, and pure natural ability, as a father I want to support him 100 percent, so i would like to take his natural ability to the next level and explore his potential by providing him some real hitting instructions,lessons, clinics, etc with someone that really knows their stuff. Due to the number of different instructors and clinics ive seen around my area, im very weary and dont want to make a mistake of taking him to someone that wont teach him the right way.I need everyone and anyone with intellegent Advise, what would yall do?

    can someone provide some advise..
    thanks,
    baseball dad.

  2. #2

    advice

    I would save yourself alot of money and heart ache and order RightView Pro ip300-AS Instructional Player . Trust me for 65.00 you can't go wrong

  3. #3
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    jhonny,
    At 8 years old you do not need to spend a lot of money for instructional DVD's or class. The first priority is to make it fun. At eight most children do not have the motor skills to learn much more than the basic elements of the swing. The key at this age is to make sure you set him up for future success and to keep it fun. If you are looking for basic information I would suggest PCR (Posture - Connection - Rotation).

    My baby is still playing himself and coaching Jr. High. His love for the game was developed when he was only 7 or 8. No matter how good your son gets or how much he struggles remember he's just a kid. Make it fun.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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  4. #4
    Jake P.

    im not at expert so therefore i would not disagree much on advise someone else provides me, however i will say that his motorskills are actually pretty darn good for his age, and ofcourse I want him having fun and enjoy the game, the last thing i want to do is hamper his joy for this game,im a strong advocate of having fun which is what this game should be all about, altough i must say to him FUN is hitting line drives, hitting the ball hard and getting on base, scoring runs and hopefully hitting one out of the park once and a while, so all im trying to do is give him the tools to suceed. This fall He tried out for two different Triple A teams and made it to both, he was picked up by one of them so i suppose he displayed some pretty good potential. Setting him up for success is exactly what im trying to do and if there is anything i can do right now to help him succed more often than not, then ive acheived one of my goals...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhonny View Post
    Setting him up for success is exactly what im trying to do and if there is anything i can do right now to help him succed more often than not, then ive acheived one of my goals...
    It sounds like your priorities are good. Just remember that success at eight is not measured in how well he hits the ball, it's measured in how much fun he's having doing it.

    PCR!
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (18561929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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  6. #6
    dang I know your trying to make him better but holy cow there are way too many eager adult parents that come here asking how to make their 8-11 year old better, to throw harder or hit better, when I was 8-11 I didnt even worry about that I just swung the bat and maybe thats why I love baseball so much, your kids are gonna feel pressured to play the game they may be good but they arent gonna enjoy it. Let them play!

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    Keep in mind your not making your kid a HS stud at 8, but at the same time they are sponges and will totally love everything you can teach them. My 7yr old could pick apart a swing on video and live last year when he was 6. I didn't pressure him into anything and don't make him do it, I show him clips in slow motion and he takes it in. maybe 10 minutes at a time until he loses interest. video him, read more on the web, show him his video and show him his favorite player if he has one. Video is the key, keep watching and video.
    Last edited by callyjr; 12-17-2007 at 09:24 PM.

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    Be available. Answer questions simply. Encourage. Don't crowd him. Consider the obvious: pushing instruction at him (unless he asks) makes negative implications no kid needs. What he needs right now is to know he's okay and having fun.

    He's too young to hand over to a stranger; coaches have their own agendas. Most of the coaches need coaching themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Patterson View Post
    It sounds like your priorities are good. Just remember that success at eight is not measured in how well he hits the ball, it's measured in how much fun he's having doing it.

    PCR!
    If you are after plain "fun", then take the kiddos to Disney World.

    The fun I want to see these kids having through their involvement in youth sports is the enjoyment of seeing themselves succeed through their hard work.

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    I have a 7 year old and we play all the time, he played tball and with the 1st and 2nd graders last year and loved being part of the team and gettin involved.

    He too is like a sponge.

    I keep hiting drills fun by using plastic golf balls, corks, colored balls, etc etc and make fun games out of it.

    We also do lots of fielding we play around the diamond like you would play around the world in basketball.

    ground balls start at 1st need to make a clean play on the ball and a good throw home. Make it and goto 2nd then short then third and back around. Make an error and you go back.

    Stuff like that.

    Enjoy the time you have with them and go for a hot dog or pizza or mcdonalds afterwards and make it an event not just drills and work.

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    Five, I know you've been around awhile, but here's where many go wrong when kids are concerned...

    Quote Originally Posted by FiveFrameSwing View Post
    The fun I want to see these kids having through their involvement in youth sports is the enjoyment of seeing themselves succeed through their hard work.
    It really depends on what THEY consider fun.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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    Quote Originally Posted by virg View Post
    Be available. Answer questions simply. Encourage. Don't crowd him. Consider the obvious: pushing instruction at him (unless he asks) makes negative implications no kid needs. What he needs right now is to know he's okay and having fun.

    He's too young to hand over to a stranger; coaches have their own agendas. Most of the coaches need coaching themselves.
    I agree with Virg. Learn how to teach.

    Dads of youngins,
    Paul Nyman did a great 20 minute vid on this very specific topic. It may be worth your while contacting him.
    Jake
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (18561929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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  13. #13
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    My son is 12 now and hits really well. I gave him no intruction. The only thing we did was play catch and I would pitch to him. He learned to hit by just swinging and learning on his on. The only type of advice I would give him was generic type advice; for example when he first starting hitting he would always pull the ball foul - when he crushed the ball out of the park foul I would be excited and congratulatory but tell him it was real fun to watch but it was still a strike: he eventully learned to wait for the ball. I think until kids get to 11-12 it should be nothing but goofing around and having fun.

  14. #14
    At that age my suggestion is just let them be kids. Let them experience as many things as they can (sports, music, art, etc.) and let them decide what they like to do. I never ask my son to go practice baseball or any sport. He just comes to me when he wants to play. When he does, I love it. I know it was his choice and we have fun and enjoy the time together.

    I coach high school baseball and I see what some of these kids go through that are pushed from day one. They don't enjoy the game as much, period. Let me tell you this, at the high school level, we could care less what AAU, travel, or little league team you played on.

    As far as my boy, I will continue to work and practice with him when HE wants. If he decides to play or keep playing it will be his choice. I made my choices to do when I was a kid (which was baseball), but my sons interest might be music or art. If so, I love him and support his decision because it is what he enjoys to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BallCoach06 View Post
    At that age my suggestion is just let them be kids. Let them experience as many things as they can (sports, music, art, etc.) and let them decide what they like to do. I never ask my son to go practice baseball or any sport. He just comes to me when he wants to play. When he does, I love it. I know it was his choice and we have fun and enjoy the time together.
    More parents should take this advise. Too many parents spoil what could become a great love for the child.

    I coach high school baseball and I see what some of these kids go through that are pushed from day one. They don't enjoy the game as much, period. Let me tell you this, at the high school level, we could care less what AAU, travel, or little league team you played on.
    I also coached HS and you are absolutely right - I could have cared less what travel team they played on. I actually found those who played just rec ball to be generally better players in that they were easier to mold and teach. Travel players are typically full of pre-concieved notions, are being pushed by over-zealous parents and have been coached by "knowlegeable travel" coaches who sometimes do more harm than good. Travel is about winning. All the arguements about better competition and a better level of play is hogwash.

    I'm Ok with better competition, just wait until MS and the big field.

    As far as my boy, I will continue to work and practice with him when HE wants. If he decides to play or keep playing it will be his choice. I made my choices to do when I was a kid (which was baseball), but my sons interest might be music or art. If so, I love him and support his decision because it is what he enjoys to do.
    This is the formula I used and my sons (now grown men), still love the game, play and coach.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveFrameSwing View Post
    If you are after plain "fun", then take the kiddos to Disney World.

    The fun I want to see these kids having through their involvement in youth sports is the enjoyment of seeing themselves succeed through their hard work.
    Baseball for an 8yo has to be hard work? It shouldn't be anything but fun. Your philosophy is what drives many kids to other sports.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BallCoach06 View Post
    I coach high school baseball and I see what some of these kids go through that are pushed from day one. They don't enjoy the game as much, period. Let me tell you this, at the high school level, we could care less what AAU, travel, or little league team you played on.
    I coach 16U travel. We only care enough about last year to see if the player is good enough this year to help the team. How and where the player played two years ago is irrelevant. We're also leary of some of the parents. When we invite players to play for us for a weekend in the fall or attend workouts, the parents are trying out their behavior for us. Any parent coaching from the sidelines is killing their kid's chances.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TG Coach View Post
    Baseball for an 8yo has to be hard work? It shouldn't be anything but fun. Your philosophy is what drives many kids to other sports.
    What's a fun practice run like?

  19. #19
    Guys,Guys, Guys,
    I beleive my original message to this site and my intent was reasonable and with good intent. As I said before, my son does'nt (DOES NOT)have fun if he swings and misses, he doesnt have fun if he hits a ground ball to first base for an easy out. He doesnt have fun if he pops the ball up in the air to the infield etc.
    he sleeps with his bats and baseballs and gloves on a constant basis, he wants to attend the batting cages twice a week, he loves to play "baseball is his life" "He lives for this" therefore he drives me into being the dad that I am. I didnt force baseball into him, I introduced him into baseball at 5 years old and his love has been growing since then, due to those reasons I strive myself into providing him the support and foundation that will enable him to work hard/play hard and therefore he would receive the results HE wants.

    I dont know how many of you are currently involved with any 8 year old leagues or watched AA or AAA 8 year olds but to my surprise they are pretty darn good, way better than when I was 8. I was never lucky enough to enjoy the feeling of hitting a ball over the fence in little league and yet my son already hit 4 in 10 games this past fall. I mean if the school systems are teaching these kids mulitplication, division etc at 2nd grade these days, with the proper instructor and proper program why would anyone think that they are not ready to grasp and understand the proper way to swing the bat that will enable them to be more succesfull? and why do we think this will take the fun out of the game, you would think this will add more fun once he starts crushing the ball!! maybe im just not making sense and maybe im just way out of bounds here , am I ?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach C View Post
    What's a fun practice run like?

    If you're coaching kids and don't know the answer - you should not be coaching kids.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (18561929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhonny View Post
    I dont know how many of you are currently involved with any 8 year old leagues ...
    I've seen 18 seasons of 8 year olds come and go since my son played as an eight year old.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (18561929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach C View Post
    What's a fun practice run like?
    In 7/8's we ran a lot of drills like competitions to make it fun instead of just reps. But an 8yo doesn't need to take 500 grounders a week like an older player might (mine has from age eleven to fourteen). A 8yo doesn't work hard to make the high school team or whatever level. He plays hard to have fun and build passion for the game. When you're dealing with 8yo's you're teaching more of them to be baseball fans than future high school players.
    Last edited by TG Coach; 12-18-2007 at 07:28 PM.

  23. #23
    Jake P,

    I understand what most of you are trying to explain and what you were attempting to advise, but i think that compared to our age of baseball back in those days the level of athleticism, competitivenes, quality instruction and coaching was either non existent, or incomparable to todays times, many things are different today vs 20 years ago.Ofcourse im not a professional coach, so i dont have an expert opinion, my level of baseball was stopped at High School senior level. Yet,
    "Dont worry guys, I will make sure my sons love for the game does not diminish or decreases due to my attempt to help him"
    Bottom line, if my son gets upset during games for not performing better due to lack of proper baseball intructional training then BI-GOLLY I feel like its my duty to provide that for him. Also another PRO vs CON is; if baseball will continue to be his passion, providing him with sometype of formal instruction and training now will prepare him even more so at this current age and therefore develop proper techniqes now vs trying to break off bad habits later at 11, 12, 13 years old. I would assume there is someone out there that agrees there is some sense in that last statement? maybe...

  24. #24
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    If your son is good enough to play in college they'll still be breaking him of bad habits. Then if he plays pro ball they break him of more bad habits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhonny View Post
    I understand what most of you are trying to explain and what you were attempting to advise, but i think that compared to our age of baseball back in those days the level of athleticism, competitivenes, quality instruction and coaching was either non existent, or incomparable to todays times, many things are different today vs 20 years ago..
    I am not comparing "our" age of ball. I was 8 in the early 60's. What I'm offering is 22 years of watching 8-year-olds come and go as a State Certified Coach, clinician and teacher, involved at the LL, MS, HS and Legion levels. I have seen what becomes of those who start as energetic 8 y/o's and have a basic understanding of what works and what doesn't. I have seen my own 8 y/o's sons mature into adult players and coaches.

    What you are doing with your son can be (and I truly hope) the greatest experience you can have as father and son. I still enjoy playing catch with my boys and my 77 y/o dad. In 22 years of coaching I have seen hundreds of "energetic" parents who "know" their own child help their off-spring by making baseball the best experience of his lifetime. I have unfortunately seen more make the experience a miserable journey.

    Talent matters not at eight. Fun does. I have seen many talented players quit the game before HS.
    Last edited by Jake Patterson; 12-18-2007 at 07:44 PM.
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
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