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Thread: Tony Malinosky, 101, one of 15 Survivng Players of 1930s Major Leagues Baseball

  1. #1

    Tony Malinosky, 101, one of 15 Survivng Players of 1930s Major Leagues Baseball

    Oldest living major leaguer, Tony Malinosky reached age 101 today. He played half a season for as a Brooklyn Dodgers third baseman in 1937. He is also one of only 15 living players who played in the majors in the 1930s. A post by Baseball Fever member 'bbxpert' almost two years ago to the day:
    (10/07/08) indicated that there were 29 surviving players of 1930s baseball at that time, so the number of survivors has been virtually halved in the past two years.
    The three previous owners of the title "Oldest Living Major Leaguer", prior to Malinosky, all died at age 100.
    What follows is a list of the surviving players from 1930s major leagues baseball. 12 of the 15 have had their birthdays already in 2010. Three others have their birthdays in November. For these three players I am listing their ages as: _ years, 11 months.

    # Player ( Position) Career Span Current Age

    1. Tony Malinosky (3B) 1937-37 - 101
    2. Ace Parker (SS) 1937-38 - 98
    3. Alex Pitko (OF) 1938-39 - 95 years, 11 months
    4. Ralph Hodgin (OF) 1939-48 - 95
    5. Benny McCoy (2B) 1938-41 - 94 years, 11 months
    6. Art Kenney (P) 1938-38 - 94
    7. Eddie Joost (SS) 1936-55 - 94
    8. Phil Cavarretta (1B) 1934-55 - 94
    9. Buddy Lewis (OF) 1935-49 - 94
    10. Bob McNamara (3B) 1939-39 - 94
    11. Al Veigel (P) 1939-39 - 93
    12. Mike Palagyi (P) 1939-39 - 93
    13. Bobby Doerr (2B) 1937-51 - 92
    14. Bob Feller (P) 1936-56 - 91 years, 11 months
    15. Al Brancato (SS) 1939-45 - 91.

    Bob Feller and Bobby Doerr were perennial all-stars and were elected to the Baseball Hall Of Fame.
    Phil Cavarretta, Eddie Joost, and Buddy Lewis also were all-stars at certain points of their careers.
    Two-Sports Pro Star, Ace Parker left baseball to concentrate on his career in the NFL and AAFC and was later elected to the Pro Football Hall Of Fame as a Running Back & Defensive Back.
    Last edited by philliesfiend55; 10-05-2010 at 12:37 PM.

  2. #2
    Pretty cool. I used to have a file on my computer where I kept track of all the living 1930's players, but I got lazy about keeping it updated a while back. There were about 70 when I started it. I'm surprised there are only 15 now.

  3. #3
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    So I gather no one who played in the 1920's is alive anymore?
    Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
    So I gather no one who played in the 1920's is alive anymore?
    Correct. Al Lopez, who died in late October 2005, about three days after his former team the Chicago White Sox won the 2005 World Series, was the last livng player from the 1920s.
    (Lopez's MLB Playing Career: 1928, 1930-1947). He held the record for most MLB games at Catcher for 40 years until Bob Boone broke it in 1987 and Lopez later reached the Hall Of fame as a Manager.
    Last edited by philliesfiend55; 10-05-2010 at 12:34 PM.

  5. #5
    I think Dummy Hoy was the last survivor from the 1880s?

    Charles Emig was the last living player who played in the 19th century.

    Smoky Joe Wodd was the last living player who played before 1910 and I'd assume the last teammate of Cy Young.

    Chet Hoff was the last living player from the deadball era.

    Phil Cavarretta is the last living player who played against Babe Ruth when Ruth was with the Braves in 1935.

    Bob Feller is the last living player to pitch to Lou Gehrig. I'm not sure if he pitched to Rogers Hornsby, but if he did, hes the last one to do that too.

  6. #6
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    wow i never woulda thought that there was anyone who played against Babe Ruth is still alive. Ill deff be talking about that to friends.

    Quote Originally Posted by History Of Baseball Fan View Post
    I think Dummy Hoy was the last survivor from the 1880s?


    Charles Emig was the last living player who played in the 19th century.

    Smoky Joe Wodd was the last living player who played before 1910 and I'd assume the last teammate of Cy Young.

    Chet Hoff was the last living player from the deadball era.

    Phil Cavarretta is the last living player who played against Babe Ruth when Ruth was with the Braves in 1935.

    Bob Feller is the last living player to pitch to Lou Gehrig. I'm not sure if he pitched to Rogers Hornsby, but if he did, hes the last one to do that too.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by philliesfiend55 View Post
    Oldest living major leaguer, Tony Malinosky reached age 101 today. He played half a season for as a Brooklyn Dodgers third baseman in 1937. He is also one of only 15 living players who played in the majors in the 1930s.

    1. Tony Malinosky (3B) 1937-37 - 101
    2. Ace Parker (SS) 1937-38 - 98

    Two-Sports Pro Star, Ace Parker left baseball to concentrate on his career in the NFL and AAFC and was later elected to the Pro Football Hall Of Fame as a Running Back & Defensive Back.
    Due to the death of Ralph Kercheval two months before his 99th birthday on 10/6/10, former Philadelphia Athletic, and Pro Football Hall Of Famer, Clarence "Ace Parker" has become the oldest living Pro Football player. Kercheval born in December 1911 was five months older than "Ace" (born in May 1912). Parker is the second oldest major leaguer to have played in the 1930s (SEE ABOVE) and the third oldest living major leaguer behind Tony Malinosky, 101, and Connie Marrero, 99. Marrerro played in Cuba most of his career but came to the Washington Senators at age 39, where he pitched for five years between the ages of 39 and 43, between 1950 and 1954. He was named to the 1951 American League All-Star team.
    Parker starred in the NFL as a offensive and defensive halfback from the late 1930s to the Post-World War Two, late 1940s.

    -philliesfiend55-

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by History Of Baseball Fan View Post

    Bob Feller is the last living player to pitch to Lou Gehrig. I'm not sure if he pitched to Rogers Hornsby, but if he did, hes the last one to do that too.
    Feller pitched against Hornsby on April 24, 1937.

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