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Maxx
02-02-2007, 11:01 AM
I've got a catcher's mitt that was left out in the rain and now it's hard as a rock. I've got a guy who says he can clean and recondition it for $35, but by the time I pay for shipping, I'll have about $50 in it, which I might as well buy a new glove. Anyone have tips on what I can do to clean and condition it myself so that I can at least use it as a practice glove? I'm looking for a good fix--not things like baking it in an oven.....:crazy

Chris O'Leary
02-02-2007, 11:11 AM
I've got a catcher's mitt that was left out in the rain and now it's hard as a rock. I've got a guy who says he can clean and recondition it for $35, but by the time I pay for shipping, I'll have about $50 in it, which I might as well buy a new glove. Anyone have tips on what I can do to clean and condition it myself so that I can at least use it as a practice glove? I'm looking for a good fix--not things like baking it in an oven.....:crazy

Try using a product that contains Lanolin. It's a natural compound that is found in sheep skin.

I use Wilson's Pro Stock Glove conditioner. Rawlings has a similar product. I also think that Lexol is Lanolin-based.

Many shaving creams also contain Lanolin.

TrojanSkipper
02-02-2007, 11:26 AM
A good site on that is www.glovemedic.com

He recommends Lexol Leather care products. Says to stay away from Oils like Gloveoleum and the Wilson glove conditioner because the oil makes your glove heavy.. Lanolin products I've used do work well.

Maxx
02-02-2007, 11:48 AM
Thanks....I just bought some glove conditioner, but I don't remember what brand or whether it has lanolin or not. I'll have to check.....

Hardball
02-02-2007, 01:39 PM
Good advice on the Lanolin. I use the old fashioned Barbasol shave cream with lanolin on new gloves to make them a little more supple, (makes them smell pretty too), but it sounds like you are way past that.

The stuff you want to look for is Lanolin Anhydrous, which is blended without water. A little tougher to work with especially when it's cold but the stuff has been used for years for anything from bringing old boots and saddles back to fixing chapped lips. You can find it at natural food/herb type places or have your pharmacist order it. Should be $2 - $3 a tube.

Leave it with the glove in the sun or in the car trunk in the sun for an hour or so before starting and just rub small amounts into the leather. Toss it back into the trunk and check it in a couple days. A tiny bit goes a long ways but don't get impatient because it may take a bit for the leather to absorb th lanolin, just don't goop a bunch more on as that will make the leather sticky.

CPatt44
02-02-2007, 01:53 PM
Rub entire glove with vaseline. this will help soften and condition the leather without soaking into the leather making it too heavy.

Lanolin is good but when found in oil or shaving cream can weigh a glove down tremendously.

I use vaseline on my gloves whenever they feel a little stiff to me. Use is as much as you want without worrying about it. Think of your glove as skin (that's what it really is). You put veseline on your lips and other dry body parts. Why not put it on your glove.

Chris O'Leary
02-02-2007, 01:58 PM
Rub entire glove with vaseline. this will help soften and condition the leather without soaking into the leather making it too heavy.

This is questionable advice.

Vaseline is a petroleum-based product and will have a tendency to make the glove heavy and may cause the leather to break down.

In contrast, Lanolin is a natural product that comes from the skin of sheep. IOW, it's nature's skin conditioner (and at the end of the day leather is skin).

CPatt44
02-02-2007, 03:12 PM
This is questionable advice.

Vaseline is a petroleum-based product and will have a tendency to make the glove heavy and may cause the leather to break down.

In contrast, Lanolin is a natural product that comes from the skin of sheep. IOW, it's nature's skin conditioner (and at the end of the day leather is skin).


On the contrary, Nokona has used it for over 75 years. as their "secret" glove conditioner.

What you use is all a matter of preference. Lanolin is good but rarely found in it's natural form. Veseline is petroleum based and I have used them on many of may gloves and not one has gained weight. :lookitup

Go with what you feel is best.

chesspirate
02-03-2007, 01:48 PM
i've used mink oil with good success

StanTheMan
02-03-2007, 02:05 PM
This will help you.....

http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/2003/sept/gloves/bookcov.jpg


You can get it for as little as $5. From as little as $2.94 on Amazon as I type this.

I vote FOR Lanolin products, and against straight vaseline.

I picked up a great book at the local half price bookstore titled Glove Affairs, by Noah Lieberman, and it had a section on how the big leaguers break in gloves. They do all kinds of crazy stuff... soak it in the hot tub, beat the crap out of it with a bat, untie all the lacing and take infield with it -- with NO lacing, etc.

These guys get the gloves for FREE, unlike you and I. We need safer methods. IMO, Vaseline is NOT one. Shaving Cream is very much a SOAP product, and I would use it on the pocket only.

Whatever you use, use it sparingly. You can always add, you cannot take away.

The book was great, it included a history of the glove, how it developed from looking like the human hand (with a puffy thumb and base) to a device which closes around the ball - catching it where there is no hand (the web and the area between the thumb and first finger).

Glove affiars also a chapter on professional glove restorers, with info on how to contact them, their specialties, etc as well as a chapter on the big $$$ market for "gamers", how Spalding became the second (but most famous) glove wearer during the games' infancy, and glove wearing took off from there without stigma, the relatively slow evolution of the glove, the revelation that was the Wilson A2000, etc.

A Great book if you are a glove nut. It also goes into just about ALL of the methods out there, and thoroughly describes (with photos!) about a dozen current products, and their effects on a glove. Lexol, Straight Lanolin (hard to find), Glove Loogie (forget the manufacturer), Shaving Cream, etc....

Good luck with your restoration!!

Bryan in Indy

StanTheMan
02-03-2007, 02:10 PM
On the contrary, Nokona has used it for over 75 years. as their "secret" glove conditioner.

.

With all due respect, the book I mentioned above disputes this, and has PLENTY on Nokona... such as the fact that they are the Manufacturer which produces the highest percentage of their gloves right here in America.

I woud wager my precious Rawlings Gold GLove Model GGP601B (outfielders mitt with the both rare, and classic, "Trap-Eze" Six Finger design used by Ozzie Smith) that Nokona never wipes their gloves down with straight vaseline.

RobV
02-04-2007, 09:35 AM
Glove Loogie

Great stuff!

Ursa Major
02-06-2007, 12:10 AM
I've got some of the Nokona stuff and it doesn't say what's in it, but it sure feels like Vaseline. I still have the tube but only use it as an off-season softener/sealant, because it leaves the surface of the glove sticky. I don't get the sense that it's absorbed into the leather as well as the lanolin products -- as you'll need it to do for reconditioning. Because the task may take several applications, I'd be worried about something that's oil based which might weigh down the glove.

I was steered by a specialty shop to something called Glove Stuff, which is a white, lanolin based product that looks and feels like hand cream. I've used it on our last two gloves with great results, and I'm sold on it. The producer has a web site called: http://www.sandalady.com/... (Yeah, she started repairing sandals and moved on to gloves.) Since she does glove repair, I think she's got a good handle on what works.

I'd stay away from shave creams with lanolin -- it's the lanolin you need, not the soap. Get a conditioner with lanolin.

Whatever subtance you use, I think you will require patience. Apply the goop, wrap the glove around a ball, and wait for two days and apply some more.

But, it's likely never to be the same glove. If you're playing high level ball, you may have to resign yourself to having it be your "backup" mitt. If you're using it for youth ball, you can shop around and get a good "Worth" brand mitt for less than $50.00

StanTheMan
02-08-2007, 06:05 PM
The Sandallady is profiled in the book I mention above. I use a product called Pro-Prep which was invented by the Chemistry teacher at a local high school. He has sold his product to the Reds, and Cardinals.

It feels exactly like vaseline, but there is no vaseline in it at all. It also does not smell like vaseline.

Jesse
02-11-2007, 04:30 PM
I woud wager my precious Rawlings Gold GLove Model GGP601B (outfielders mitt with the both rare, and classic, "Trap-Eze" Six Finger design used by Ozzie Smith) that Nokona never wipes their gloves down with straight vaseline.

From Nokona's web site (http://www.nokona.com/glove_care.html):

Our company has for decades used and recommended that one of the best and safest leather cleaners and conditioners is untreated petroleum jelly. Professional glove repairmen and leather specialists agree that this is one of the best applications, both for cleaning and conditioning glove leather.

Our recommendation for the use of petroleum jelly is simple. During the break-in period, treat your new glove with a light application, working it into the leather. This will reduce the stiffness of the new leather and facilitate a faster and more comfortable break-in procedure. Also, at the end of the season, take a generous amount of petroleum jelly and thoroughly cover the outside and inside of the glove. Donít ignore the laces or hard-to-get-to areas, both inside and outside the glove. Then take a clean rag and wipe off excess to remove grit and grime. This will also remove and help neutralize much of the salt and acid buildup inside the glove caused by perspiration, a chief problem to the leather lining, usually made of softer leather.
If you click the link and read further, they do state that there are other cleaners and conditioners that are safe to use but they don't specify.

StanTheMan
02-11-2007, 06:20 PM
Well.... I guess since Jesse found this info and not CPat44.... I can keep my Rawlings? :ughh

I sit corrected.

tforman
06-22-2008, 08:41 PM
I beleive in Lanolin. You can actually get 100% lanolin in something called "Lansinoh" which is for nursing mothers for their nipples....I kid you not. And it's not that expensive. Try your local pharmasy

stl002
06-23-2008, 01:04 AM
trust me fellas...as long as u don't soak your glove in lanolin, it won't really weigh your glove down...but just to be safe, use Lexol or any "cream product"...personally, i like the Pecard leather dressing the best...the guy from www.baseballgloverestore.com said that you can apply as much pecard dressing as u want without worrying about the glove becoming really heavy...he also recommends dr. jackson's hid rejuvenator...he said that although the wilson's pro stock glove conditioner is a cream, it's still very "watery". personally i would go with pecard glove conditioner or the hot glove cream conditioner because it contains both lanolin and vitamin e
http://www.sportsproductreview.com/display/ShowJournal?moduleId=902706&categoryId=80988&currentPage=4

glovemedic
06-23-2008, 07:45 AM
I've got a catcher's mitt that was left out in the rain and now it's hard as a rock. I've got a guy who says he can clean and recondition it for $35, but by the time I pay for shipping, I'll have about $50 in it, which I might as well buy a new glove. Anyone have tips on what I can do to clean and condition it myself so that I can at least use it as a practice glove? I'm looking for a good fix--not things like baking it in an oven.....:crazy

Let it dry out naturally and then recondition it with Lexol. If it is really dry and stiff, use the Lexol NF and follow up with Lexol in the brown bottle. You ought to have approx $20 bucks in the glove by then for the cost of materials, and enough Lexol left over to condition about 10-15 more gloves. Good luck. I am also available to relace your mitt if necessary, and the cleaning/conditioning is included as a service.

glovemedic
06-23-2008, 07:47 AM
My bad, the op was over a year old. I am guessing the problem is solved by now. How is the new mitt breaking in ?


Let it dry out naturally and then recondition it with Lexol. If it is really dry and stiff, use the Lexol NF and follow up with Lexol in the brown bottle. You ought to have approx $20 bucks in the glove by then for the cost of materials, and enough Lexol left over to condition about 10-15 more gloves. Good luck. I am also available to relace your mitt if necessary, and the cleaning/conditioning is included as a service.

chesspirate
06-23-2008, 11:28 PM
i've personally worked on a dozen or so of my own gloves and also have done that many or more reconditioning for other people as well.

I've read up on all this mumbo jumbo glove stuff for years, starting for me with the glove in the hot tub and tie it up theory. I then moved on to glove oils and stuff(5 or so brands), tried shaving cream, mink oil etc.

It's funny, i've tried to stay objective and tried so many different things, usually multiple substances at differing thiknesses on different parts of the same glove (i'm a nut what can i say) and for ME at least i have come to an odd conclusion.

Based on my own gloves, certain ones breaking in better than others and one in particular lasting way longer than it should, to go along with the feedback provided by those who have worn my reconditioned gloves, this is what i've come to... overoiling. i've always read this to be wrong and i understand the argument, but my overoiled gloves last longer, look better, break in easier and make others happier with thier gloves as well. And the worst part of it is that most any of the 'major' glove oils seems to do the trick. no one oil in particular has wowed me much more than any others, mink oil worked okay, but not like the glove oils and shaving cream turned in the worst results for me. ASAP after water touches my gloves (and i do 'wash' them lightly with water from time to time with a damp sponge) oil is put on after teh leather dries.

If you don't believe me, then don't try it, i wouldn't want to force anyone, but that's what i've come across at least, believe it or not.

stl002
06-24-2008, 02:02 AM
i've personally worked on a dozen or so of my own gloves and also have done that many or more reconditioning for other people as well.

I've read up on all this mumbo jumbo glove stuff for years, starting for me with the glove in the hot tub and tie it up theory. I then moved on to glove oils and stuff(5 or so brands), tried shaving cream, mink oil etc.

It's funny, i've tried to stay objective and tried so many different things, usually multiple substances at differing thiknesses on different parts of the same glove (i'm a nut what can i say) and for ME at least i have come to an odd conclusion.

Based on my own gloves, certain ones breaking in better than others and one in particular lasting way longer than it should, to go along with the feedback provided by those who have worn my reconditioned gloves, this is what i've come to... overoiling. i've always read this to be wrong and i understand the argument, but my overoiled gloves last longer, look better, break in easier and make others happier with thier gloves as well. And the worst part of it is that most any of the 'major' glove oils seems to do the trick. no one oil in particular has wowed me much more than any others, mink oil worked okay, but not like the glove oils and shaving cream turned in the worst results for me. ASAP after water touches my gloves (and i do 'wash' them lightly with water from time to time with a damp sponge) oil is put on after teh leather dries.

If you don't believe me, then don't try it, i wouldn't want to force anyone, but that's what i've come across at least, believe it or not.

i completely agree...i'm really not that afraid of over oiling my gloves like all of the other ppl. from my experience, if u over oil it and it gets a little heavy, just play with it for a couple of days and it should return to normal

hellborn
06-24-2008, 05:50 AM
For the rock hard soaked glove that the thread started with, I'd let whatever I put onto it soak in for a day or two, put a ball in the pocket, wrap the glove with rubber bands, put it on the ground, and then beat the crud out of it with a baseball bat for 10-15 minutes.